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links for 2010-10-31

  • Gartner released its 2010 Magic Quadrant for Workplace Social Software report this week. The same five vendors held onto the Leaders and Challengers quadrants, while the Visionaries and Niche Players quadrants thinned out. IBM, Jive and Microsoft remained the "Leaders" and Atlassian and OpenText remained the "Challengers." Several vendors dropped off the list completely. XWiki, a "Niche Player," was the only completely new vendor to make the cut.
  • Journalists are looking for ways to reinvent their careers as the media landscape continues to shake and shift. Many reporters are hoping to carve out niches in the digital space and launch their own Internet ventures. At the Saturday morning panel, “Turning Bits Into Bucks,” three entrepreneurs shared secrets to success when it comes to creating and sustaining online businesses.
  • A very popular questions from our government clients is: “which enterprise platform should we use for collaboration?”. From the very beginning, the conversation gears toward tools and technologies, and possibly technologies that government can select and control.

    There are several reasons for this:

    * Social networking is dealt with as a strategy, or a program. Strategic objectives are set, and they are rarely quantifiable (“to increase transparency”, “to engage citizens”, “to improve knowledge management”). Such objectives lead to a business case to invest money in tools and people to achieve them.

  • Twitter has established itself as a means of broadcasting information to wide group of people all at once. But, for those times where you want to talk more intimately, Twitter also has the ability to send a Direct Message (DM) that is private between the two parties. Well, it's supposed to be private, but the reality is perhaps not as secretive as one might expect.

    Every 140-character nugget of wisdom you tweet will be fed to anyone who follows your Twitter account, and is also publicly searchable by default. So, if you tweet "Getting sushi for lunch today, who's in?" your Twitter followers will instantly see the message in their Twitter feed, and anyone else that searches based on keywords like "sushi" or "lunch" might also uncover your tweet.

  • Seattle CIO: I’m convinced we’ll eventually support personal smart phones and tablets, but we need better tools and more staff. For 2010, they remain on my Tech Terror Watch List.

Filed under: delicious

links for 2010-10-30

  • The Spiceworks Network is a community of over 1 million IT pros from SMBs in over 190 countries that use the free Spiceworks IT management application and online community to manage and collaborate on everything IT. For many, working as the one-man IT shop is a thankless job that is often times only recognized by co-workers when the email server goes down.

    In the Spiceworks community, these folks find answers to problems, as well as camaraderie with other like-minded professionals. The members help each other do their jobs, share best practices, rate products and solve technology problems, while providing a valued outlet for collaboration. So much so that community members asserted their own identity by naming themselves "SpiceHeads." Through word-of-mouth efforts referred to as "spreading Spiceworks," SpiceHeads have helped attract 1-in-5 IT pros to the community.

  • Over the years, I’ve often been asked three questions:

    1) Why on earth do you write all those articles and books?
    2) Where do you find the time to write?
    3) Were you ever concerned that writing/publishing would put your career at risk?

    First, the question of why I, or any potential author, would write in the first place. We all begin as readers. I lived in Greece as a child and there was no television in those days, in the early 1960s. I became an endless reader of books, a habit that continues to this day with far too many books in my house – what my wife Laura calls my “gentle madness.”

  • Published in the Evening Standard – January 12, 1946
    If you look up ‘tea’ in the first cookery book that comes to hand you will probably find that it is unmentioned; or at most you will find a few lines of sketchy instructions which give no ruling on several of the most important points.

    This is curious, not only because tea is one of the main stays of civilization in this country, as well as in Eire, Australia and New Zealand, but because the best manner of making it is the subject of violent dispute

    (tags: tea)

Filed under: delicious

links for 2010-10-29

  • Forrester’s Ted Schadler looked at how tablets are making their way into the enterprise in a new report, asking more than 200 companies about their experiences with the iPad (primarily) since January 2010. What they found was both surprising and, in some ways, to be expected.
    IT Leads the Charge

    First, and most unusual, it looks like the drive to bring the iPad to enterprise isn’t being pushed from the bottom up, as is often the case with new technology adoption at larger companies. Instead, IT departments are stepping up and initiating iPad pilot programs of their own accord. According to Forrester, this time IT doesn’t want to be stuck in the reactionary position of playing catchup, as happened when the iPhone first starting infiltrating the enterprise in a major way.

Filed under: delicious

links for 2010-10-29

  • Forrester’s Ted Schadler looked at how tablets are making their way into the enterprise in a new report, asking more than 200 companies about their experiences with the iPad (primarily) since January 2010. What they found was both surprising and, in some ways, to be expected.
    IT Leads the Charge

    First, and most unusual, it looks like the drive to bring the iPad to enterprise isn’t being pushed from the bottom up, as is often the case with new technology adoption at larger companies. Instead, IT departments are stepping up and initiating iPad pilot programs of their own accord. According to Forrester, this time IT doesn’t want to be stuck in the reactionary position of playing catchup, as happened when the iPhone first starting infiltrating the enterprise in a major way.

Filed under: delicious

links for 2010-10-29

Filed under: delicious

links for 2010-10-29

Filed under: delicious

links for 2010-10-29

  • Forrester’s Ted Schadler looked at how tablets are making their way into the enterprise in a new report, asking more than 200 companies about their experiences with the iPad (primarily) since January 2010. What they found was both surprising and, in some ways, to be expected.
    IT Leads the Charge

    First, and most unusual, it looks like the drive to bring the iPad to enterprise isn’t being pushed from the bottom up, as is often the case with new technology adoption at larger companies. Instead, IT departments are stepping up and initiating iPad pilot programs of their own accord. According to Forrester, this time IT doesn’t want to be stuck in the reactionary position of playing catchup, as happened when the iPhone first starting infiltrating the enterprise in a major way.

Filed under: delicious

links for 2010-10-29

  • Forrester’s Ted Schadler looked at how tablets are making their way into the enterprise in a new report, asking more than 200 companies about their experiences with the iPad (primarily) since January 2010. What they found was both surprising and, in some ways, to be expected.
    IT Leads the Charge

    First, and most unusual, it looks like the drive to bring the iPad to enterprise isn’t being pushed from the bottom up, as is often the case with new technology adoption at larger companies. Instead, IT departments are stepping up and initiating iPad pilot programs of their own accord. According to Forrester, this time IT doesn’t want to be stuck in the reactionary position of playing catchup, as happened when the iPhone first starting infiltrating the enterprise in a major way.

Filed under: delicious

links for 2010-10-29

  • Forrester’s Ted Schadler looked at how tablets are making their way into the enterprise in a new report, asking more than 200 companies about their experiences with the iPad (primarily) since January 2010. What they found was both surprising and, in some ways, to be expected.
    IT Leads the Charge

    First, and most unusual, it looks like the drive to bring the iPad to enterprise isn’t being pushed from the bottom up, as is often the case with new technology adoption at larger companies. Instead, IT departments are stepping up and initiating iPad pilot programs of their own accord. According to Forrester, this time IT doesn’t want to be stuck in the reactionary position of playing catchup, as happened when the iPhone first starting infiltrating the enterprise in a major way.

Filed under: delicious

links for 2010-10-29

  • Forrester’s Ted Schadler looked at how tablets are making their way into the enterprise in a new report, asking more than 200 companies about their experiences with the iPad (primarily) since January 2010. What they found was both surprising and, in some ways, to be expected.
    IT Leads the Charge

    First, and most unusual, it looks like the drive to bring the iPad to enterprise isn’t being pushed from the bottom up, as is often the case with new technology adoption at larger companies. Instead, IT departments are stepping up and initiating iPad pilot programs of their own accord. According to Forrester, this time IT doesn’t want to be stuck in the reactionary position of playing catchup, as happened when the iPhone first starting infiltrating the enterprise in a major way.

Filed under: delicious

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